Making change (in multiples)

It’s tempting to seek to change just one person at a time. After all, if you fail, no one will notice.

It’s also tempting to try to change everyone. But of course, there really is no everyone, not any more. Too much noise, too many different situations and narratives. When you try to change everyone, you’re mostly giving up.

The third alternative is where real impact happens: Finding a cohort of people who want to change together.

Organizing them and then teaching and leading them.

It’s not only peer pressure. But that helps.

When a group is in sync, the change is reinforcing. When people can see how parts of your message resonate with their peers, they’re more likely to reconsider them in a positive light. And mostly, as in all modern marketing, “people like us do things like this” is the primary driver.

I got a note from a reader, who asked, “Not only you, but many business authors do promotions like if I buy 2, 10, 100… (or whatever number greater than 1) copies, I get perks. Honestly, I never really got this concept. As I understand, you get the most value out of business/self improvement books, if you buy them for yourself (and when you read them in the right time of your life).”

The thing is, my goal isn’t to sell books, it’s to make change. And with Your Turn, I took the idea of changing in groups quite seriously. The site doesn’t sell single copies, only multiples (when you buy one, I send you two, etc.). Here’s what I’ve discovered after five printings of the book: When an organization (or a team, or a tiny group) all read and talk about the same book, the impact is exponentially greater.

If you want to make change, begin by making culture. Begin by organizing a tightly knit group. Begin by getting people in sync.

Culture beats strategy. So much that culture is strategy.